Monthly Archives: August 2016

Maine’s newest National Park?

Kayaking Penobscot Bay in Maine

2016 marked the 100th anniversary of the US National Park Service, which includes Acadia National Park. What better birthday present than an expansion, and a new landmark in Maine?!  U.S. Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell and National Park Service Director Jonathan B. Jarvis supported President Obama’s designation of Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument, the first national monument to preserve the landscape and honor the history and culture of Maine’s North Woods. President Obama used the Antiquities Act to establish 87,500 acres of Acadia National Park Sign in Mainelands donated to the National Park Service by the Elliottsville Plantation, Inc., (EPI), including the East Branch of the Penobscot River and its tributaries, one of the most pristine watersheds in the Northeast, according to the National Park Service.

Pond Island in Penobscot BayUS Secretary Jewell visited the national monument lands in Penobscot County, Maine, in August to celebrate the designation with state and local officials and members of the public. National Park Service staff will be on site to assist with the first steps to open the park.

“As the National Park Service begins a second century of conservation this week, the President’s designation of Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument serves as an View at the top of Acadia National Parkinspiration to reflect on America’s iconic landscapes and historical and cultural treasures,” said Secretary Jewell. “Through this incredibly generous private gift for conservation, these lands will remain accessible to current and future generations of Americans, ensuring the rich history of Mainers’ hunting, fishing and recreation heritage will forever be preserved.”

EPI is the nonprofit foundation established by Roxanne Quimby and run by her son Lucas St. Clair. Their gift of land is accompanied by anendowment of $20 million to supplement federal funds for initial park operational needs and infrastructure development at the new monument, and a pledge of another $20 million in future philanthropic support.

Cape Roisier, MaineMaine’s new national monument  will be managed by the National Park Service as the 413th park unit in the National Park System. The monument parcel is east of the 209,644-acre Baxter State Park and Mt. Katahdin -Maine’s highest peak at 5,267′ and the end of the Appalachian Trail.

The Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument designation is the result of a extensive effort by Quimby and her son St Clair. Quimby purchased the lands with her wealth from Burt’s Bees.

Tidal Salt Marsh, MaineThe new national monument includes the East Branch of the Penobscot River and some of Maine’s North Woods known for its world-class recreational opportunities to hike, canoe, hunt, fish, snowmobile, snowshoe and cross-country ski. These and other traditional activities will continue to be available in the new national monument.

In addition to protecting spectacular geology, biodiversity, wildlife and recreational opportunities, the new monument will help support climate resiliency in the region. The protected area – together with the neighboring Baxter State Park to the west – will ensure that this large landscape remains intact, bolstering the forest’s resilience against the impacts of climate change. – Thank to the National Park Service for this new release.

Fawn spotted in Acadia National Park

For Maine lodging in the Katahdin region, in Baxter, Millinocket, and Greenville & Moosehead, see our Highland Maine Lodging Guide.

Copyright and photography – VisitMaine.net, 2017

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What a summah its been upta Maine!

Cormorant looking out over the marina in Boothbay, Maine.Mainahs, that’s Maine locals, love to talk about the weathah… they complain in wintah about havin’ to get out their snow blowah, and they lament that the summah goes by some wicked quick.

Summer lobster bake in Maine

This summer in Maine has been “pretty awful nice” according to folks around Maine, which is high praise. Long stretches of sunny days, not a lot of rain, has been fantastic for them tourists from away that come in with their money and leave with our lobstah, though I suppose farmahs could complain about havin to watah their crops so often. Ayuh. See our guide to Maine slang.

Cape Porpoise bouys used for nautical decor

But seriously, its been a hum dingah summer in Maine, perfect warm breezy days to go fishin, paddleboard, kayak around the hahrbahs (see our guide to boating in Maine) ,
go upta camp, dance at a rustic Maine barn wedding, host a lobster clam bake, stay all day at the beach playing volleyball or doin’ nothin’ atall.

Ramshead Lighthouse in Maine

From the southern Maine coast to Down East, the summer temperatures have been spot on, with only a few scorchas (when the heat index goes over 90). Inland the lakes and rivers have been calm, clear and perfect for a Maine vacation – living up to the legendary license plate promise “vacationland”.

Sebago Lake in fall

Best of all, soon it will be fall y’all. Fall foliage in Maine is among the most brilliant and splendid the world over. With maples, birch, oak and elm turning fiery reds, orange and yellow contrasting the bold evergreen of this Pine Tree State.

Cuckolds Lighthouse on Maine coast

Then comes Maine wintah, and the Mainahs can go back to complainin’ about how frigin cold it is, bout damn freeze your digits off lobsterin in that nippy weathah. No mattah, whether or not, weather or not, Maine is still the way life should be.

Footbridge Sign in Maine

Plan your Maine vacation and learn to talk like a Mainah about the weathah, visit Maine lighthouses, and eat lobstah! See our Maine lodging guide for where to stay and where to chartah a boat!

Copyright and photography – VisitMaine.net, 2016

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Why we Love Old Orchard Beach

Top 10 Reasons to Love Old Orchard Beach

1. The Pier

OOB Pier

Old Orchard Beach Pier

Hosting celebrities including Louis Armstrong and Frank Sinatra, the famous Old Orchard Beach Pier extending 500 feet into the Atlantic is lined by boutique shops, restaurants and even a night club.

2. The Beach

Beach walkers

Boasting 7 miles of beach, its little wonder why Old Orchard Beach along with its vacation amenities hug the sandy shoreline. Both the northern (known as Scarborough Beach)  and southern (known as Ferry Beach in Saco) ends of Old Orchard Beach away from the Pier epicenter, are quieter areas for vacationers offering peace and solitude despite the hub bub of the vibrant seaside town.

3. Palace Playland

Old Orchard Beach amusement parkPalace Playland makes Old Orchard Beach even more perfect for family vacations. You have the beach, nearby restaurants, ice cream shacks, arcade games, park rides so you won’t have to hear the kids exclaim that they’re hungry, or hot, or bored. And after you’re screaming in a combination of terror and delight on the tilt-a-whirl, you can also take pause in the scenic landscape of the coast.

4. Outdoor recreation

Tidal Salt MarshYup, in Old Orchard Beach, you can also revel in the great outdoors from coastal boat excursions or fishing along the beach. Just minutes away from town at the Scarborough Marsh, you can rent a kayak or canoe and leave behind the sights and sounds of town and hear nothing but the wind and the see nothing but wilderness.

5. Great Place to Stay and Play

Old Orchard Beach truly has something for everyone. Vacationers can choose to find lodging in Old Orchard Beach at a hotel near the beach, gain some independence in a vacation rental cottage, or even bring the RV or pitch a tent in the many campgrounds right in town. The only sad part of vacationing in Old Orchard is leaving… ah, love is heartache.

See our Maine Lodging Guide

Copyright 2018 VisitMaine.net

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