Old Orchard Beach Campgrounds

Old Orchard Beach, also known as OOB, is one of the more popular areas for camping in the state. Few Mainers consider this “real” camping, claiming that real camping is getting away from it all in the deep woods, fishing in a river or taking a snowmobile trip in Greenville. However, kids and parents will love the convenience and fun of  camping in Southern Maine, especially at Old Orchard Beach Maine. Continue reading

Rachael Carson: Environmental Legacy

Rachel Carson Wildlife RefugeIf you haven’t read “Silent Spring”, you’ve likely discussed the book in school. Many say this book instigated the environmental movement and publicized awareness of the chemical impact on nature. What you may not have known is that  author Rachel Carson has very close connections to the state of Maine. Continue reading

Acadia National Park Camping

Acadia National Park oceanview

Cadillac Mountain Summit, Acadia National Park

Acadia National Park is among the most popular national parks in the US. Stretching across a large expanse of Mount Desert Island, here the mountains greet the sea with breathtaking coastal vistas, making the region arguably the most beautiful landscape to behold on the entire east coast. Since its discovery by Samuell de Champlain in 1604, the Acadia National Park estate has remained relatively unchanged and unspoiled. It’s no surprise then that Acadia National Park camping is quite popular in the region.

Consisting of more than 47,000 acres, Acadia National Park is a worthy retreat for camping and exploration. Here, visitors are likely to observe wildlife from deer, puffins, beavers to moose. The drive to your campsite will promise beautiful scenery and set the tempo for your camping trip. Continue reading

Maine’s Best Casinos and Gambling

Maine Casino

Oxford Casino

When you think of gambling or casinos, you picture the spectacle of casinos in Las Vegas or Atlantic City. You don’t think Maine, after all its “Vacationland”. Well there are a few casinos, raceways, bingo games, slot machines, harness racing, and live poker in the Pine Tree State, and its far more beautiful and affordable than big gambling resorts and cities. Continue reading

Visiting Monhegan Island

To quote Rachel Field, “If once you have slept on an island. You’ll never quite be the same.”

monhegan-villageThat couldn’t be more true than in Maine…and Monhegan. You must visit Monhegan Island in Maine… maybe even sleep over in one of the Monhegan island inns or the Trailing Yew.

Mohegan is authentic, beautiful, rustic, the land time forgot. First stop off the ferry, pick up The Monhegan Island Association  trail map to guide you on a great walk around the island to the 1824 Monhegan Island Lighthouse, around the 17 miles of paths over rocky cliffs by cathedral pine trails, to the highest point of Black Head, which towers 160 feet above the sea with stunning views out to see and off the great granite cliffs on island.

Be warned of poison ivy onmonhegan-lighthouse Monhegan– a problem being managed by the association as they try to keep it  off the maintained pathways, but wander off the trails at your own risk and watch out for steep cliffs, and crashing waves on the oceanfront rocks that could sweep visitors out to sea with no guard rails, fences or warning signs. Monhegan is very natural and rugged.

Surprisingly Monhegan Island has cell phone reception, but monhegan-hikeyou come here to get away from technology. See the dramatic rugged cliffs of White Head and Black Head, and the shipwreck on the southern shores near Fish Beach and Swim Beach.

Bring your camera and wear sneakers or hiking shoes for the sometimes rugged rigorous hiking paths (all marked on the Monhegan trail map), nothing is paved, cars and bikes are not allowed on the passenger ferry.

monheganIn the village of Monhegan by the ferry dock you will find a general store, some art galleries, and few lobster and clam shacks. Nothing fancy. The Monhegan House, The Hitchcock House, and The Island Inn offer lodging, and there are a few cottage and house rentals.

Monhegan is easily reached by ferry, just an hour ride aboard Hardy Boats from New Harbor, or from Boothbay Harbor or Port Clyde, and a priceless trip to a simpler time as an islander. Just 10 miles offshore on this mountainous island about 70 residents exists peacefully and productively within a square mile of spectacularly scenic terrain.

monhegan-cliffsMonhegan was first settled by Native Americans for its prime fishing, which is Monhegan’s industry to this day (although lobster fishing season is closed in summertime around Monhegan) along with accommodating summer overnight guests and day visitors off the ferries and Monhegan tour boats.

Enjoy your time on Monhegan  while in Vacationland. And be sure to explore other great seacoast towns in Maine’s midcoast and Bar Harbor too!

Copyright and photography – VisitMaine.net, 2018

Blog MaineGoogle PlusFacebookPinterestTwitter 

 

Top Things to Do In Castine

castine-harbor-viewCastine is a delightful seaside village perched on the tip of a peninsula in Penobscot Bay, mid-coast Maine. Castine is one of the oldest and wealthiest communities in Maine, with a deep history of battles and occupations since the 1600s. From Natives to the Dutch and French Noblemen Castine who gave the town its name in1796 to The British, and now college students at Castine’s Maine Maritime Academy – Castine’s story is rich and complex.

sail-castine-harbor (2)There is so much to see and do in Castine, from the busy waterfront to the fabulous seaside cottages and hillside campus, to beaches and beautiful natural walking paths and Dyce Head Light Castine is also home to beautiful inns and BnB’s, waterfront restaurants serving fresh Maine seafood, shops and art galleries.

Top Things to do in Castine Maine

dennetts-wharf-settingGo to Dennetts Wharf for lunch or dinner – ideally sit outside on the deck. Great seafood by the sea, a picture perfect setting with a casual but fresh menu. They boast the longest Oyster Bar in Maine, and a huge beer list. Pin a dollar on the wood beam sail loft rafters. Dollars accumulated have been donated to 911, Hurricane Katrina and to a local fireman in the past to the sum of $12k at each.

castine-town2Shop Castine’s Main Street  – Four Flags, Lucky Hill, art galleries, Dolphin Books, books stores and ice cream shops.

Stroll up the hill to Battle Ave to see over 100 historic markers, monuments and bunkers, this was a stronghold against the British during the 1700 and 1800s. Pick up a historical Castine walking map for reference as you tour the sights, Federal, Italianate and Victorian homes lining the grand elm tree lined streets of Castine.

Dine at Pentagoet Inn for the best food in Castine and friendly service steps from the waterfront. Stay at this charming 1894 BnB too. Pentagoet is the French word denoting the Penboscot.

red-bell3Walk the campus of Maine Maritime Academy founded in 1941. About 1,000 students attend the maritime and oceanographic college on a beautiful seaside campus in Castine. The waterfront campus is an impressive training vessel -The State of Maine – a 500-foot naval research ship on on the dock unless it’s out for a semester at sea with student aboard. Only strategic drawback to Maine Maritime is its 87% male… #maletime academy.

dyce-lighthouse-castine (7)Visit the grassy knolls of Castine’s Fort Madison, Fort Knox and Fort George, built during the nineteenth century to protect the harbor. Only the grass bunkers remain at Fort Madison, at the entrance to the harbor – its a scenic park for a pleasant picnic now. Fort George, built by the British in 1779, has been partially restored as a state memorial, marking the last fort surrendered by the British at the end of the Revolutionary War. Fort Knox, Maine’s largest historic fort, was built in 1884 to protect from potential British naval attack along the Penobscot River. Fort Knox is one of the best-preserved historic military forts in New England, The Fort is only open to visitors seasonally, but the grounds are open year-round.

Dyce Head Lighthouse is privately owned, not open to the public. Although the light was discontinued in 1935, the original Keeper’s house, barn and oil house still remain on the property.

Castine Maine Lighthouse

Dyce Head Lighthouse is privately owned. Although the light was discontinued in 1935, the original Keeper’s house, barn and oil house still remain on the property

Witherle Woods is a spectacular 185-acre preserve on the Castine peninsula, with 4.2 miles of trails for hiking, walking or even enjoying a picnic lunch at Blockhouse Point with views of Penobscot Bay and Wadsworth Cove. Wear sneakers or hiking shoes for these great but rustic trails that bring you to old battle batteries and spectacular lookouts. There are more challenging hikes on nearby Blue Hill Mountain or further north – the famous Acadia National Park.

Castine’s best beaches are Wadsworth Cove and Backshore Beach, this protected cove offers smooth pebbly sand and a gentle surf. The western exposure provides great views of Penobscot, the Camden hills and is a perfect place to watch the sunset. Pack a cooler – no services here.

kayak-penobscott-bay (4)Kayaking in Castine is ideal on the Penobscot Bay and Bagaduce River.

History buffs will love Wilson Museum run by Castine’s Historical Society loaded with ancient farming equipment. Visit the pre-revolutionary John Perkins House, blacksmith shop and The Abbott School -a restored old school house. Castine Public Library is another beautiful building.

pond-islandTravelling by boat to Castine, arrive at 3 for a slot on the Town Docks, and go out to Pond Island for a picnic by day, bring your dinghy to explore this gem of an island surrounded by beaches, a tidal pond sits in the center with views of the Camden Hills and neighboring Hog Island.

See more on Castine, and places to stay in Castine during your tour of the Maine Coast.

By Heather Burke,  – Copyright & Photo 2018 by VisitMaine.net

Blog MaineGoogle PlusFacebookPinterestTwitter

 

Top Things to Do in Southwest Harbor


southwest-harbor-harbor8
Southwest Harbor is a beautiful yacht center and harbor – aplty named for its locale on the south west side of Mount Desert Island, between Northeast Harbor and Bass Harbor. Considered the quiet side compared to more bustling Bar Harbor, So’West is home to Maine’s best top builders – Hinckley, Ellis, Classic Boats, Wilbur, and Morris Yachts.

american-flag-big-blue-swThe harbor is beautiful with views out toward Little Cranberry Island. The “downtown” of Southwest Harbor is idyllic with just enough shops, restaurants, Beal’s Lobster Pound and nearby hikes. Southwest Harbor has several hotels and inns, Inn at Southwest, Harbour Cottage Inn, The Moorings, Kingsleigh Inn, Penury Hall, Clark Point Inn and the Claremont Hotel.

Top Things to Do in Southwest Harbor on Mount Desert Island
• Walk to “downtown” Southwest Harbor, 5 minutes from the waterfront, for Maine craft shops, cafes, gift shops like Moody Mermaid, and Sawyers Market – a classic Maine store on Main Street, and lcoal dining at Red Sky and Sips.
• Stroll out Clark’s Point Road to Beal’s Lobster Pier for a fresh seafood treat and to see the US Coast Guard Station.
kayakers• Canoe, Kayak or SUP around the incredibly scenic Southwest Harbor and Somes Sound.
• Have a slice of homemade pie (that sits in the window and wafts sweet smells to passersby) and ice cream at the Quiet Side Café and Ice Cream Shop in town.
• Go to the Claremont Hotel for sunset and cocktails and a great view towards Somes Sound, the North East’s only fjard (similar to a fjord) six with dramatic cliffs. A game of croquet on the beautiful seaside grass lawn is sublime.
sw-habor-me (8)• Dock your boat at Dysarts Great Bay MarineSouthwest Harbor’s full service marina with very scenic, protected docks for yachts up to 180’, a friendly staff, showers and wifi for boat guests. You’re in good company with Hinckley and Morris Yachts built right here in Southwest Harbor.
restaurant-sw-harbor3• Go to Grumpy’s for breakfast – better than it sounds, the Crab Benedict and the harbor view are awesome, the service – sorta surly.
• Browse local Acadian art galleries, Clark Point Gallery and Acadia Photo School among others to see local artists’ beautiful depictions of the sailboats, granite cliffs and rocky shores of Acadia.
• See the Butterfly Release at Charlotte Rhoades Garden and Butterfly Park every July at 191 Main Street
• Walk the 2 mile Beech Cliff Loop with views of Echo Lake and Somes Sound.

northeast-harbor-maine (7)• Visit Hinckley Boat Yard at 130 Shore Road, also boat makers – Classic Boat Shop, Ellis Boats, Wilbur Yachts and Ralph Stanley traditional lobster boats all made here in Southwest Harbor.
• Take a ferry to Islesboro on Little Cranberry Island for an island walk, and lunch or dinner at Isleford Dock restaurant – with great views back toward MDI.

merchants-row-sailing (6)See more on visiting Southwest Harbor, and Bass Harbor Lighthouse, along with nearby Northeast Harbor and Somes Sound, and our Top 10 Things to do in Acadia National Park during your visit to Maine.

By Heather Burke Copyright 2018  VisitMaine.net

Blog MaineGoogle PlusFacebookPinterestTwitter