Tag Archives: Maine Lobster

Lobster Sexual? Maine Men as trendy setters & record breakers

COOLLOBSTERDown East Magazine has introduced the latest – the LobsterSexual – a hot Maine guy who is causing a fashion stir when not catching crustacean from Maine’s icy cold waters.  That’s right, to top of the LumberSexual in his plaid shirt and woolies, Maine lobstermen are now the fashionista according to Maine’s leading magazine, wearing PVC bib pants, rubber deck boots and wool beanie.

Well, the Maine lobster industry deserve some props, though maybe not for fashion, but for their record season. According to the Bangor News, Maine lobstermen had a record year in 2016, hauling 131 million pounds, $533 million worth of the popular crustacean.

lobsterMaine’s lobster catch has never been as high as it has been over the past five years. In the 1960s, the annual catch hovered around 20 million pounds, according to the Department of Marine Resources. It wasn’t until 1991 when the fishery cracked the 30 million-pound mark, 40 million in 1997, then 50 million in 1999. In 2002, lobstermen hauled in 63.6 million pounds,  today’s lobstermen catch is 124 million.

So I guess Maine lobstermen are hot, record breaking, on fire… trending #LobsterSexual! Have your fresh Maine lobster shipped by some hot lobsterman to your door today – the lobster – not the lobsterman…

Copyright VisitMaine.net 2018

Blog MaineGoogle PlusFacebookPinterest Twitter

 

Best Way to Eat a Fresh Maine Lobster

lobsterEveryone visiting Maine craves a fresh Maine lobster. It’s a #1 attraction in vacationland – to enjoy a bright red cooked lobster – ideally served by the sea! But many folks from away don’t know much about lobster, how to eat it, what to eat it with, how it is best served according to Mainers. So here is your guide to eating Maine lobster.

First – be sure the lobster is alive and fresh before its cooked. The best way to assure you have a quality lobster is to go to a busy restaurant, lobster pound or fish market – Maine Lobster Shackpreferably near the ocean, fresh off the dock is the best bet for a fresh bite.

Second – lobster needs to be steamed or boiled properly. There is some local debate about which is better: boiling or steaming your lobster. See our guide on Cooking Maine Lobster!

Third – Proper Lobster Accompaniments:

lobsterLobster is best with hot melted butter… it’s really that simple.

Lobster is traditionally served by Mainers with fresh corn on the cob, and a side of potato chips – or some old schoolers serve tater tots (yup, like you used to eat in grade-school)!

Steamers, native Maine clams – steamed, are often served beforehand or beside your lobster, with the broth in which they were steamed. The broth is used to give the clams a hot water bath before your eat them, after you remove the neck skin. Steamed clams are classic and delicious. Warning – don’t eat them if the shells don’t open after cooking. Them ain’t keepahs. See our guide to Maine slang.

If you want to get “real fancy” include a cup of New England clam chowder – the white cream base, not the modified Manhattan chowder in a tomato broth…that ain’t chowdah.

restaurant-sw-harbor3Fourth – Drinks with Lobster
The best beverage with a Maine lobster is a buttery Chardonnay. Or if you’re fancy and enjoy bubbly, Champagne, a sparkling wine or Rosé is lovely. For beer drinkers, nothing too hoppy – just cold and clean is best with the buttery rich taste of lobster. Red wine lovers can pair a light crisp Pinot Noir – not too heavy – you don’t want to overpower the delicate taste of the lobster meat.

red-bell3Fifth – The best dessert after a good Down East Feast, also called a Clam Bake or Lobster Bake, if you have room in your tummy after all that seafood yummy – strawberry shortcake, homemade blueberry pie, or blueberry buckle are great choices – made from native Maine berries and topped with fresh whipped cream! Simple. Perfection!

Enjoy your Maine Lobster while in Vacationland. And be sure to order some Lobster to be delivered to your home too!

Copyright and photography – VisitMaine.net, 2018

Blog MaineGoogle PlusFacebookPinterestTwitter